18 New Books on Suffering

Over the span of two years we have been blessed with at least 18 new titles on various topics under the umbrella of suffering and grieving — loneliness, depression, disability, chronic pain, terminal illness, raising special needs kids, and grieving lost children.

Here’s a chronological list of the valuable titles that have caught my attention (and let me know what books I missed in the comments).

Zack Eswine, Spurgeon’s Sorrows: Realistic Hope for Those Who Suffer from Depression (Nov. 20, 2015).

Betsy Childs Howard, Seasons of Waiting: Walking by Faith When Dreams Are Delayed (May 31, 2016).

Andrew and Rachel Wilson, The Life We Never Expected: Hopeful Reflections on the Challenges of Parenting Children with Special Needs (June 30, 2016).

Phil Ryken, When Trouble Comes (June 30, 2016).

Dave Furman, Being There: How to Love Those Who Are Hurting (Aug. 31, 2016).

Nancy Guthrie, What Grieving People Wish You Knew about What Really Helps, and What Really Hurts (Sept. 30, 2016).

Joni Eareckson Tada, A Spectacle of Glory: God’s Light Shining through Me Every Day (Oct. 4, 2016).

Vaneetha Rendall Risner, The Scars That Have Shaped Me: How God Meets Us in Suffering (Oct. 12, 2016).

Ann Voskamp, The Broken Way: A Daring Path into the Abundant Life (Oct. 25, 2016).

Douglas Taylor, I Shall Not Die, But Live: Facing Death with Gospel Hope (Dec. 13, 2016).

Lydia Brownback, Finding God in My Loneliness (Feb. 28, 2017).

Russ Ramsey, Struck: One Christian’s Reflections on Encountering Death (Mar. 14, 2017).

Sarah Walton and Kristen Wetherell, Hope When It Hurts: Biblical Reflections to Help You Grasp God’s Purpose in Your Suffering (Mar. 27, 2017).

Brian Tabb, Suffering in Ancient Worldview (Apr. 20, 2017).

Richard Belcher, Job: The Mystery of Suffering and God’s Sovereignty (June 2, 2017).

Kelly Kapic, Embodied Hope: A Theological Meditation on Pain and Suffering (June 6, 2017).

David Powlison, God’s Grace in Your Suffering (Feb. 28, 2018).

Jack Deere, Even in Our Darkness: A Story of Beauty in a Broken Life (Apr. 10, 2018).

Suffering

Francis I. Andersen, Job (Tyndale OT Commentary), 68:

Men seek an explanation of suffering in cause and effect. They look backwards for a connection between prior sin and present suffering. The Bible looks forwards in hope and seeks explanations, not so much in origins as in goals. The purpose of suffering is seen, not in its cause, but in its result. The man was born blind so that the works of God could be displayed in him (Jn. 9:3).

But sometimes good never seems to come out of evil. Men wait in vain. They find God’s slowness irksome. They lose heart, and often lose faith. The Bible commends God’s self-restraint. The outworkings of His justice through the long processes of history, which sometimes require spans of many centuries, are part of our existence in time. It is easier to see the hand of God in spectacular and immediate acts, and the sinner who is not instantly corrected is likely to despise God’s delay in executing justice as a sign that He is indifferent or even absent. We have to be as patient as God Himself to see the end result, or to go on living in faith without seeing it. In due season we shall reap, if we do not faint.

I Cling to My Jesus

The following 4-minute video captures the moving testimony of one family faithfully enduring pain and suffering. Says the father John Knight: “I have a little boy who is blind and has Autism and growth hormone deficiency. He doesn’t eat well or sleep well. My wife lives with stage four cancer in her body. I have a hope and I have a future. I have a Rock. I cling to my Jesus.” Simply amazing. Watch their story here: